Naive view of Pool Cottage Lostwithiel, dated 1874 presented to Thos E Hawken, Watchmaker
Naive view of Pool Cottage Lostwithiel, dated 1874 presented to Thos E Hawken, Watchmaker
Naive view of Pool Cottage Lostwithiel, dated 1874 presented to Thos E Hawken, Watchmaker
Naive view of Pool Cottage Lostwithiel, dated 1874 presented to Thos E Hawken, Watchmaker

Naive view of Pool Cottage, Lostwithiel, dated Xmas 1874

 

A charming naive oil on board with the inscription on the reverse:

 

"“Pool Cottage”

Painted by WH Marshall, of Tangier, Lostwithiel and presented by him to his master Thos E Hawken, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Queen Street, Lostwithiel, Xmas 1874"

With amusing image of a clock to the far left - not shown.

 

Also signed bottom left on a small stone: WH Marshall, Lostwithiel, 1874.  

 

 

In its original faux painted rosewood frame, some faults.

 

Frame:  19” x 15”     48cm x 39cm

Sight:  15” x 11.25”   38cm x 28cm

 

£ 425

 

Ref 397

 

Lostwithiel is a lovely very old town, nestled in the countryside of South Cornwall.

 

I found the following information on the Lostwithiel Museum website, when I doing a little research on the characters mentioned on the reverse of the painting. I can only assume that the artist, WH Marshall was an apprentice at this time.

 

"Thomas Edward Hawken was born at Tangier  (then in Lanlivery parish, now Castle Hill, Lostwithiel) in 1836.  Hawken was by trade a watchmaker and jeweller, a professions that,   as frequently found at this time, led him into photography.

 

The 1861 census finds him listed as a watchmaker and lodging in St Austell, which would have brought him into contact with fellow jeweller/watchmaker/ photographer William Michell, St Austell’s first long established photographer.

 

Thomas Edward Hawken continued to run the Queen Street Studio after the death of Richard White in 1866.

 

Hawken’s output mainly consists of carte-de-visite portraits and family groups with occasional topographic views, taken from the mid-1860s until his death in 1877.

 

As with many early professionals, photography was not Hawken’s main source of income, understandably so, given the relatively small population of Lostwithiel and the numerous photographers in the nearby larger towns of Bodmin and St Austell. 

 

However, by 1871 Thomas had been joined in the business by his younger cousin William Edward Hawken who was born in Lostwithiel in 1852 and listed as a photographer in the 1871 census at his King Street address.'