Seacombe, Merseyside, iron paddle steamer naive oil painting
Seacombe, Merseyside, iron paddle steamer naive oil painting
Seacombe, Merseyside, iron paddle steamer naive oil painting
Seacombe, Merseyside, iron paddle steamer naive oil painting
Seacombe, Merseyside, iron paddle steamer naive oil painting

'Waterlily' Iron Paddle Steamer, Merseyside, dated 1928

 

North Wales, Wallasey to Liverpool, 'The Waterlily', Merseyside iron paddle steamer

 

A naive early 20th century oil on canvas and of the Seacombe ferry,’ The Waterlily’, an iron paddle steamer, built to carry passengers across the River Mersey estuary to and from Liverpool.  The Waterlily was launched in 1862, and could carry 793 passengers.  It was gas lit and the first vessel with saloons.  It was scrapped in 1892.    

 

Thinly painted, but with a wealth of detail we see in the background  Stokes Hotel , The Marine Hotel and The American bowling alley all of which existed.  The painting is I suspect  not topographically correct, as it was painted in 1928, (almost 40 years after the ferry was scrapped), but painted from an idealised memory of a time gone by.   

 

However, anyone who is at all familiar with the area and the river Mersey, will immediately recognise the accuracy of the green/brown choppy water!

 

Signed faintly lower left W S McGuire, 1928.

 

In excellent condition.  Lined.  In a period ebonised frame with gold slip.  

 

Sight:    22.5 "  x  11”   (57 cm x 32cm)

Frame:   28” " x 17.5”    (70cm x 44cm)

  

£ 775.00

 

Ref: 211

 

folk art iron paddle steamer, Mersey

 

Note:

Seacombe is a district of the town of Wallasey, at the Mouth of the River Mersey, on the Wirral Penisular, North West England.

 

As late as the early 19th century the area had a reputation for smuggling and wrecking, and then, for a period at least, the shoreline between Seacombe and Rock Point became an attractive area to which affluent Liverpool merchants and sea captains retired.   Docks were constructed in the 1840’s, and the area became increasingly industrial.

 

For anyone interested in the history of this area please take a look at the excellent site: www.historyofwallasey.co.uk, from which my historical notes were taken, with thanks.